thoughts of a post-colonial feminist

thoughts & images on feminism, (neo)colonialism, postmodernism, the middle east, cupcakes, marxism, and cats

Revolutionary Hope: A Conversation Between James Baldwin and Audre Lorde

mocada-museum:

baldwin-lorde

JB: One of the dangers of being a Black American is being schizophrenic, and I mean ‘schizophrenic’ in the most literal sense. To be a Black American is in some ways to be born with the desire to be white. It’s a part of the price you pay for being born here, and it affects every Black…

The false separation between political & economic

"The popular movements that erupted in 2011 represented much more than the overthrow of despised dictators. To concentrate on surface appearances of these demonstrations obscures their real content. These mobilisations indicate that ‘politics’ and ‘economics,’ which are typically conceived as separate spheres, are fused and part of the same struggle.

The battle against political despotism is inevitably intertwined with the dynamic of class struggle. These uprisings reflected not just a crisis of regime legitimacy or a concern with political freedom, but were - at their root - confronting the outcomes of capitalist development itself.”

- Adam Hanieh in his book (aka my new obsession) Lineages of Revolt

Syria

"It would be wrong to assess the struggle in Syria solely through the lens of geopolitics - this simply ignores the political economy of class and state formation in the country, reducing the Syrian people to a classless mass of rival "sects" and "tribes." The roots of the Syrian uprising lie in an attempt to overthrow an autocratic regime presiding over a highly polarized neoliberal economy. Yet, as was the case with Libya, Western governments - acting in conjunction with regional allies such as the Gulf and Turkey - will clearly attempt to push the course of the uprising in a direction amenable to their long-term interests. China and Russia on the other hand have viewed the country as an important position from which to build a counterweight to US power.

Compounded by the specific nature of Syrian state and society - the deep linkages of the country’s bourgeoisie with the Assad regime, the distinctive sectarian characteristics that underpin its mode of rule, and the particular geopolitical rivalries that surround the country - Syria is enduring a tragic and very bloody conflict.”

- Adam Hanieh, “Lineages of Revolt”

For everyone who thinks racism in Europe is because of the economic crisis:

"Scapegoat theories of race posit that under economic and social duress, particular sub-populations are cordoned off as intruders, invented to deflect anxieties, and conjured up precisely to nail blame. For Foucault, racism is more than a response to crisis; it is the expression of an underlying discourse of permanent social war, nurtured by the bio-political technologies of incessant purification.

Racism does not merely arise in moments of crisis, in sporadic cleansings. It is internal to the bio-political state, woven into the weft of the social body, threaded through its fabric.”

Ann Stoler

thebodynarratives:

“There is power in looking” – bell hooks
Socially constructed ideas about race and gender remain key in how Women of Colour perceive themselves. Patterns of images used by media, culture and society constantly tell us what we should look like and who we should be. They produce a literal and symbolic gaze outside of the self in order to render these bodies into objects to be looked at.
The importance of the gaze then is that it allows dominant groups the power to control how Women of Colour interact with social spaces, other people, and most importantly with themselves. The ‘gaze’, however, is never totalizing and looking can offer an important space of critical resistance.
Using film, visual art, dance and poetry, A Different Mirror provides a platform for Women of Colour artists to explore the conflicts about how we see ourselves versus how we are seen.
The 3 day exhibition and educational activities confront these crucial questions about the systems or structures that shape our relationship to our bodies and its connection to our identities. It holds up a mirror to see and know ourselves differently.
Exhibition Public Opening Times:
Saturday 26th April 2014 10 am – 5pm
Sunday 27th April 2014 12 pm – 5pm
 Featuring works by: Indigo Williams, Lesley Asare, Sanaa Hamid, Nasreen Raja, Sarina Leah Mantle, Wasma Mansour, Uchenna Dance, Patricia Kaersenhout, and Ng’endo Mukii, Aowen Jin, Janine ‘j*9′ Francois, Clare Eluka, and Emerzy Corbin.
Reflections: Art as a Tool for Healing
Saturday 26th of April 2014
6:30pm – 8:30pm £7.50 (early bird £6.50)
This artist seminar explores the ways in which art can be used to heal and empower ourselves and others. It offers insight into different artistic mediums and how these artists have used their practices for reclamation and transformation.
Featuring a performance by writer Yrsa Daley-Ward, talks by Indigo Williams (poet) and Lesley Asare (visual and performance artist) of I Shape Beauty, and a panel discussion featuring Sharmila Chauhan, Aowen Jin, Vicki Igbokwe (Uchenna Dance) and Bola Agbaje.
Buy tickets now .
Journeys and Reflections: Women’s Circle
Sunday 27th of April 2014 
10am – 12pm (Free)
Join us for an intimate afternoon of yoga and meditation (with Michelle Holmes), tea and cake, and collage making to share your journeys to self-acceptance with us.
We have 12 spaces for Women of Colour aged 18 + To reserve your place email info@thebodynarratives.com.
We are also still open for applications for our workshop series ‘The Secrets Women Keep’. Applications close 2nd of April 2014

thebodynarratives:

There is power in looking” – bell hooks

Socially constructed ideas about race and gender remain key in how Women of Colour perceive themselves. Patterns of images used by media, culture and society constantly tell us what we should look like and who we should be. They produce a literal and symbolic gaze outside of the self in order to render these bodies into objects to be looked at.

The importance of the gaze then is that it allows dominant groups the power to control how Women of Colour interact with social spaces, other people, and most importantly with themselves. The ‘gaze’, however, is never totalizing and looking can offer an important space of critical resistance.

Using film, visual art, dance and poetry, A Different Mirror provides a platform for Women of Colour artists to explore the conflicts about how we see ourselves versus how we are seen.

The 3 day exhibition and educational activities confront these crucial questions about the systems or structures that shape our relationship to our bodies and its connection to our identities. It holds up a mirror to see and know ourselves differently.

Exhibition Public Opening Times:

Saturday 26th April 2014 10 am – 5pm

Sunday 27th April 2014 12 pm – 5pm

 Featuring works by: Indigo Williams, Lesley Asare, Sanaa Hamid, Nasreen Raja, Sarina Leah Mantle, Wasma Mansour, Uchenna Dance, Patricia Kaersenhout, and Ng’endo Mukii, Aowen Jin, Janine ‘j*9′ Francois, Clare Eluka, and Emerzy Corbin.

Reflections: Art as a Tool for Healing

Saturday 26th of April 2014

6:30pm – 8:30pm £7.50 (early bird £6.50)

This artist seminar explores the ways in which art can be used to heal and empower ourselves and others. It offers insight into different artistic mediums and how these artists have used their practices for reclamation and transformation.

Featuring a performance by writer Yrsa Daley-Ward, talks by Indigo Williams (poet) and Lesley Asare (visual and performance artist) of I Shape Beauty, and a panel discussion featuring Sharmila ChauhanAowen Jin, Vicki Igbokwe (Uchenna Dance) and Bola Agbaje.

Buy tickets now .

Journeys and Reflections: Women’s Circle

Sunday 27th of April 2014 

10am – 12pm (Free)

Join us for an intimate afternoon of yoga and meditation (with Michelle Holmes), tea and cake, and collage making to share your journeys to self-acceptance with us.

We have 12 spaces for Women of Colour aged 18 + To reserve your place email info@thebodynarratives.com.

We are also still open for applications for our workshop series ‘The Secrets Women Keep’. Applications close 2nd of April 2014


From the “Fucking Tourists!” series by Jolipunk, who asked local people like this Peruvian woman to express their real feelings about having their photos taken by tourists.


HAHA

From the “Fucking Tourists!” series by Jolipunk, who asked local people like this Peruvian woman to express their real feelings about having their photos taken by tourists.

HAHA

(via mcojdc)

"Patriarchy requires both the sexual availability of women for male-centered enjoyment and the sexually exclusive motherly ideal."

- Huibin Amelia Chew

Dignity

"Dignity is the refusal to accept humiliation, oppression, exploitation, dehumanization. It is a refusal which negates the negation of humanity…(it is) a politics dense with the dream of creating a world of mutual respect and dignity, filled with the knowledge that this dream involves the destruction of capitalism, of everything that dehumanizes or de-subjectifies us."

- Holloway

The ‘post’ in postcolonialism is not a periodisation that signals the beginning of an era where colonialism is part of the past; on the contrary, it signifies the claim that conquest, colonialism and empire are not a footnote or episode in a larger story, but are in fact a central part of that story and are constitutive of it. The ‘post’ does not mark the period after the colonial era, but rather the effects of this era in shaping the world that is ours.”

- Sanjay Seth

'Postcolonial Theory and the critique of International Relations'

superwholockianlady:

porcupine-girl:

maymay:

“Repeat Rape: How do they get away with it?”, Part 1 of 2. (link to Part 2)

Sources:

  1. College Men: Repeat Rape and Multiple Offending Among Undetected Rapists,Lisak and Miller, 2002 [PDF, 12 pages]
  2. Navy Men: Lisak and Miller’s results were essentially duplicated in an even larger study (2,925 men): Reports of Rape Reperpetration by Newly Enlisted Male Navy Personnel, McWhorter, 2009 [PDF, 16 pages]

By dark-side-of-the-room, who writes:

These infogifs are provided RIGHTS-FREE for noncommercial purposes. Repost them anywhere. In fact, repost them EVERYWHERE. No need to credit. Link to the L&M study if possible.

Knowledge is a seed; sow it.

Reblogging because I mentioned this study in a post the other day and someone reblogged & replied insinuating that I’d made it up, but I didn’t have the citation on hand right then. As I said then: rape culture is what teaches rapists that they aren’t rapists.

^ bolded for emphasis

(via marinareise)